Franz Liszt lived in the former court gardener’s house at the edge of the Park on the Ilm from 1869 until his death in 1886. This is where he gave lessons to many young and talented pianists from Germany and abroad. In 1887 Grand Duke Carl Alexander opened several rooms to the public as a memorial site. All the furnishings in the music salon and study are authentic, including the Bechstein grand piano.

Exhibition

„Why am I in Weimar? [...] In the area of music, for works, teaching, publication, it’s a base for me in Germany.“

Liszt in a letter to Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, 10 September 1882

The music salon and study with original Bechstein grand piano
The music salon and study with original Bechstein grand piano
Death mask of Ludwig van Beethoven from Liszt’s estate
Death mask of Ludwig van Beethoven from Liszt’s estate
Dining room
Dining room

After careful restoration of the furniture and reconstruction of the tapestries and wall fittings in Franz Liszt’s living quarters on the first floor, visitors can once again experience the authentic interior design of the late 19th century.

The living room and study which comprise the central salon, as well as Liszt’s bedroom have been preserved in their original condition. The dining room bears a resemblance to its earlier furnishings, and the servant’s room is a museum presentation. A permanent multimedia exhibition on the ground floor, developed in 2006 in cooperation with the University of Music FRANZ LISZT and the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, presents Franz Liszt’s life, work and musical legacy.

History

The Liszt House was built at the end of the 18th century as the court gardener’s residence and was redesigned in 1819 by Clemens Wenzeslaus Coudray. The upper floor had been used as an art studio before Liszt took up residence there in 1869. This would be Liszt’s second stay in Weimar; he had lived in the Villa Altenburg on Jenaer Strasse during his stint as Weimar’s Hofkapellmeister between 1848 and 1861. At the invitation of Grand Duke Carl Alexander, Liszt returned to Weimar in 1869. Grand Duchess Sophie had elegantly decorated his quarters on the first floor of the gardener’s house. In the following years, Liszt spent his summers at the residence and regularly invited guests to his performances. In 1887 Carl Alexander opened the composer’s former living quarters to the public as a memorial site.

Projects of the Klassik Stiftung Weimar are funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Free State of Thuringia, represented by the State Chancellery of Thuringia, Department of Culture and the Arts.

The website of Klassik Stiftung Weimar uses cookies in order to provide you with an optimal service. By using this website, you agree. to Data protection

agree