Before he passed away in 1805, Friedrich Schiller spent his last three years at this residence on Esplanade where he wrote his famous plays “The Bride of Messina” and “William Tell”. Today, Schiller’s original desk and bed are displayed in his former living quarters.

Schiller’s study with writing desk
Schiller’s study with writing desk
Schiller’s writing desk with quill
Schiller’s writing desk with quill
Schiller’s parlour
Schiller’s parlour

Exhibition

The rooms of the Schiller Residence are decorated with original furniture from the Schiller estate and other analogous furnishings dating back to the Classical period. The tour begins on the ground floor in the former servant and utility rooms. On the first floor, one can view the chambers of the poet’s wife Charlotte and his children, and in the mansard, Schiller’s living quarters. The highlight is Schiller’s study with its mostly original furnishings. Display panels on the life and works of this multifaceted poet, and the history of the building, offer further insights into the daily life and activities at the Schiller Residence.

At the “Studiolo” visitor workshop, children and families can participate in a diverse programme of theme-based events.

„In these days I have finally fulfilled my old wish of owning my own home. For I have now abandoned all thoughts of moving away from Weimar and mean to live and die here.“

Schiller to his publisher Georg Joachim Göschen, 10 February 1802

The Friedrich Schiller monogram over the front entrance
The Friedrich Schiller monogram over the front entrance

Building history

The spacious residence on Esplanade was originally built for a merchant in 1777. Schiller moved in with his family in 1802 and had some alterations done. Following the poet’s premature death in 1805, his wife Charlotte continued living here until she died in 1826. During those years, she had let out several rooms to tenants. Eventually her children sold the property and some of the furniture. In 1847 the city of Weimar purchased the building and converted it to the first poet memorial in Germany that same year. The rooms have been restored and refurbished several times since. A new museum was built in 1988 adjacent to the Schiller Residence which now serves as the entrance to the historical residence and venue for temporary exhibitions.

Projects of the Klassik Stiftung Weimar are funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Free State of Thuringia, represented by the State Chancellery of Thuringia, Department of Culture and the Arts.

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