Blick über Blumenbeete und Brunnenhof auf das Gutshaus

Ossmannstedt Estate Park

Christoph Martin Wieland finally achieved his life-long dream of becoming a “poet squire” on his own estate in Ossmannstedt. When the poet purchased the Baroque ensemble of buildings and its accompanying park in 1797, very little remained of the original Baroque garden on account of the previous owner using its three sloping Ilm terraces for farming. “As rough in form as it be, even my overgrown Osmantinum is not without charm, at least for such an enraptured old lover of nature as its present owner. Perhaps it is precisely this condition, that there is so much to alter and improve, weed and plant, tear down and build, that forms an essential part of the inexhaustible interest I have in this small property,” Wieland wrote to Luise von Göchhausen on 13 June 1798. Wieland himself farmed the estate, planted a kitchen and rose garden, and regularly held social gatherings there. Wieland’s carefree garden and country life came to an abrupt end after the deaths of Sophie Brentano and his wife Anna Dorothea in Ossmannstedt. In 1803 the poet moved back to Weimar. When Wieland died in 1813, he was laid to rest alongside his wife and Sophie Brentano in the Ossmannstedt Estate Park according to his wishes.

The fountain house
The fountain house
View of the fountain house
View of the fountain house

In the following decades, the estate changed hands numerous times. At the end of the 1940s, the property was divided into parcels in accordance with the East German agrarian reform measure. The enclosure wall was torn down and the estate house was converted into a school. Throughout the park, one can still discern the terracing of the former late Baroque park. An especially charming feature is the fountain house opposite the poet’s residence with its Baroque grotto. A dolphin-shaped water spout is integrated in the grotto which fills an elaborate water basin.

Projects of the Klassik Stiftung Weimar are funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Free State of Thuringia, represented by the State Chancellery of Thuringia, Department of Culture and the Arts.

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